Lunar orbiter images

Lunar Orbiter 5, the last of the Lunar Orbiter series, was designed to take additional Apollo and Surveyor landing site photography and to take broad Lunar orbiter images images of parts of the Moon's far side. The spacecraft acquired photographic data from August 6 to 18, 1967, and readout occurred until August 27, 1967. Lunar Orbiter IV was designed to provide an expanded photographic survey of the lunar surface at resolutions that were greater than that possible from ground based telescopes (e.

g.like the images in the Consolidated Lunar Atlas). LO IV photographed the lunar nearside and farside, including the lunar polar regions. This new 3D image of the moon was created by using images of the same spot of the lunar surface taken from different angles by NASA's Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter.

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NASA's Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) captured the sharpest images ever taken from space of the Apollo 12, 14 and 17 landing sites. Images show the twists and turns of the paths made when the astronauts explored the lunar surface. Note: images below link to all available plates for each frame listed.

Images from these spacecraft were used by mission planners to select the Apollo landing sites on the moon. In the late 1960s, after the Apollo era, Lunar Orbiter analog tapes were placed in storage in Maryland. The Lunar Orbiter program was a series of five unmanned lunar orbiter missions launched by the United States from 1966 through 1967. Intended to help select Apollo landing sites by mapping the Moon's surface, [1 they provided the first photographs from lunar The images at the top of the page show the Lunar Orbiter spacecraft with the high and medium resolution cameras at the center, and an image of the crater Tycho taken with the Lunar Orbiter 5 medium resolution camera.

The Earth straddling the limb of the Moon, as seen from above Compton crater. The large tan area in the upper right is the Sahara desert, and just beyond is Saudia Arabia. The Atlantic and Pacific coasts of South America are visible to the left. WAC E C (Earth only), NAC M LR The Lunar Orbiter Image Recovery Project (LOIRP) is a project funded by NASA, SkyCorp, SpaceRef Interactive, and private individuals to digitize the original analog data tapes from the five Lunar Orbiter spacecraft that were sent to the Moon The Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter, or LRO, is a multipurpose NASA spacecraft launched in 2009 to make a comprehensive atlas of the Moons features and resources.

The moon's far side, taken by Lunar Orbiter 2 on 19 November 1966. This second earthrise image was taken on August 25, 1966. Most of what is visible on the Moon's surface is the far side, with the An Lunar orbiter images illustration of China's Chang'e moon probes, which are named after a goddess from Chinese mythology. China has launched two lunar orbiters to the moon (Chang'e 1 A collection of high resolution images from Lunar Orbiters I V retrieved by the Lunar Orbiter Image Recovery Project (LOIRP) are now online at NASA's Solar System Research Virtual Institute.

NASA will be updating Lunar Orbiter IV was designed to provide an expanded photographic survey of the lunar surface at resolutions that were greater than that possible from ground based telescopes (e. g.like the images in the Consolidated Lunar Atlas). LO IV photographed the lunar nearside and farside, including the lunar polar regions.

NASA's Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter has been circling the moon since June 2009, using seven instruments to examine the lunar surface and its radiation. NASA's Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) captured the sharpest images ever taken from space of the Apollo 12, 14 and 17 landing sites. Images show the twists and turns of the paths made when the astronauts explored the lunar surface.

Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter. Skip Navigation (press 2) Home; About. animations, and images in order to promote a greater understanding of Earth and Space Science research activities at NASA. All the products are free to download.

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